Folding Bike Blog

#RideMontague Hashtag Photo/Blog Contest

Hashtag-Photo-Contest-Image-1

 

#RideMontague Hashtag Photo/Blog Contest

Share a photo or blog post of you and your Montague bicycle at your favorite local spot with the hastag #RideMontague between now and December 31st and be entered for multiple chances to win a Montague Silhouette T-shirt. TWO winners will be picked EVERY WEEK!

  1. Eligibility: Open for all. Entries can be posted on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or Google+
  2. Sponsor: Montague Bikes.
  3. Promotion Period: October 23rd – December 31st, 2014
  4. How to Enter:

Photos:

– Share a photo of you and your Montague bicycle at a destination or favorite local spot before 12:00pm on December 31st, 2014.

– Post the photo to our official Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/foldingbike and use the hastag #RideMontague .

– OR share the photo publically on Google+ using the hashtag #RideMontague.

– OR post the photo on Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #RideMontague.

– For a photo to qualify, it must include 3 items: a person, a Montague bike, and a place or destination. Multiple entries allowed per person.

Blog posts:

– Share a blog post of you and your Montague bicycle by 12:00pm on December 31st, 2014.

– Share a link to the blog post to our official Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/foldingbike and use the hastag #RideMontague .

– OR share a link to the blog post publicly on Google+ using the hashtag #RideMontague.

– OR share a link to the blog post on Twitter with the hashtag #RideMontague.

– OR send it to bicycle@montaguebikes.com with the subject line “#RIDE MONTAGUE”

– For a blog post to qualify to win it has to include 3 items: story (text) including our bike (e.g. about trip, riding, maintenance ), photos and at least one photo including our bike.

– Blog posts will be reviewed and revised if necessary by the Montague team and published as a guest post on our blog at http://www.montaguebikes.com/folding-bikes-blog/. Only blog posts published on our blog will be qualified for winning. All guest blog posts will be credited to the original author with a link back to their blog. Multiple entries allowed.

5. Winner Selection:

– There will be one winning photo, and one winning blog post selected on the following dates while the contest is running. Dates of selection are October 31st, November 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, December 5th, 12th, 19th, and 31st.

6. Prizes:

– The persons who post each winning photo and blog post will receive a free Montague Silhouette T-shirt in their choice of size: Small, Medium, Large, or Extra Large

7. General Conditions:

– By posting a photo or blog post, its owner agrees that his or her name, likeness, photograph, text and/or opinions may be used for our promotional purposes in any media worldwide without any additional payment or consideration.

– We reserve the right to not fulfill a prize if it remains unclaimed by January 9th, 2015.

– We reserve the right to cancel, suspend, and/or modify the promotion, or any part of it, if any fraud, technical failure, or other factor beyond its reasonable control impairs the integrity or proper functioning of the promotion, as determined by our own sole discretion. We reserve the right to disqualify any individual if we find them to be tampering with the entry process.

This promotion is not sponsored, endorsed, administered by, or associated with any Social media channel.

One Comment

  1. Posted October 30, 2014 at 11:08 am | Permalink

    You might assume that in order for a parrot to be able to imitate the human voice.
    This means we need to shift to another perspective on a regular basis and
    remind ourselves how it feels to connect with God through our hearts.
    1- Irene Maxine Pepperberg, The Alex Studies, Harvard University Press,
    England, 1999, pp. It will also take away the redness and inflammation like Lavender and Chamomile.
    Whether it exists is beside the point: the Self, or soul as an essence has never been perceived objectively by anyone.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Posted in Events, Lifestyle | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Autumn Road Ride – Farm Lands of Western Mass

Last weekend took me back to the area where I grew up, Western Massachusetts. While it’s only about 2 hours west of Montague Headquarters in Cambridge, it’s a very different atmosphere out there. No big cities, no hustle and bustle, beautiful farmland, and most importantly, few stop lights on the rolling country hills. I took the opportunity to put some miles on my Montague FIT, and take in the beauty that is autumn in New England.

The day started with black coffee as usual, my secret weapon. (#coffeedoping)IMG_5173

It was unseasonably warm for mid-October and there was a mist in the air. No arm warmers today.

IMG_5163

While the roadside foliage burned with reds, oranges, and yellow, the fields were still green and the forest floors were still covered in bright green ferns.

IMG_5174

My friend Chris joined me for a portion of the ride and managed to capture this shot of the FIT in action.

IMG_5307cropandedit

Hadley, MA is home to several dairy farms. These cows weren’t too interested in my bike while I stopped to hydrate, but the rolling hills of their pastures were beautiful in the afternoon sun.

IMG_5410

These cows on the other hand, were quite interested.

IMG_5415

A few areas allowed me to get off the paved roads as I cut through familiar fields and wooded trails. I’m currently running 33mm semi-knobby tires on my FIT, so they handled the paths wonderfully.

IMG_5179editcrop

After about 30 miles of looping through the towns of Amherst, Hadley, and Belchertown, my route came to an end. (Not pictured: post-ride mulled apple cider)

IMG_5403editFor more photos of my adventures, follow on instagram: @montaguebikes

2 Comments

  1. Bill Castaldo
    Posted October 25, 2014 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

    I have a fit. Great bike. I’d like the handlebars a little higher. Is there a way ?

  2. Posted October 27, 2014 at 1:24 pm | Permalink

    Hey Bill,
    You could raise the bars with a different stem which angles upwards more, or for even more height you can use a steerer tube extender or install an Octagon steering system. Your local bike shop can help with either.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Posted in Adventure, Recreation, Travel | 2 Comments

6 TED Talks on Bikes and Cycling

TED Talks (TED: Technology, Entertainment, Design), are conferences held all over the world under the slogan “Ideas Worth Spreading.” They address a wide range of topics in science and culture, and often involve an element of storytelling from the speaker. You can find TED Talks on nearly any subject, and in the last few years, videos from the conferences have become wildly popular resources for forward thinking ideas.

Several TED Talks involve alternative transportation, bike infrastructure, and even cycling anecdotes.  Here are some of our favorites from over the years.

How To Build a Better Block: Jason Roberts at TEDxOU

Jason Roberts shows that sometimes you need to take initiative on your own to enact change in your community. Doing everything “by the book” and dealing with bureaucratic red tape won’t always work. Jason and a group of friends changed his community in Dallas’ Oak Cliff by re-purposing abandoned spaces, starting pop-up businesses, organizing events, and encouraging alternative transportation all on their own. Instead of waiting for permission, they just started doing. They started a Bike Friendly Oak Cliff advocacy group, and even painted their own bike lanes on underutilized streets. Surprisingly, their ideas were wildly successful, and many have become permanent fixtures in the neighborhood. There are some great lessons to be learned here.

Bicycle Culture by Design: Mikael Colville-Andersen from Copenhagenize

This is an amazing talk pertaining to urban planning to encourage bike usage. In the opinion of Mikael Colville-Anderson, traffic engineers have been failing miserably over the last 80 years. Building infrastructure just for cars has resulted in a myriad of commuting problems for many cities. Historically, streets are human spaces and just like other consumer products, they should respond to the needs of the consumer; the desires of the citizens. True human cities should be designed not only by civil engineers, but by architects, designers, and the people who live in them.

Mikael Colville-Andersen is an urban mobility expert and CEO of Copenhagenize Consulting. He is often called Denmark’s Bicycle Ambassador, and with and his team he has advised cities and towns around the world regarding bicycle planning, infrastructure, and communication strategies. He applies his marketing expertise to campaigns that focus on selling bicycle culture to a mainstream audience. His famous Cycle Chic brand has also brought a more casual elegance to cycling. Listen to this talk for a perspective from one of transportation cycling’s key figures.

Biking revolutionary Janette Sadic Khan about the most important asset of the city – streets

New York’s streets are not so mean for bikers and walkers any more. As a New York city commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan doubled bike lane number during her first year from 29 miles in 2006 to 63 miles in 2007. In the following five years additional 254 miles of bike lanes were painted. She also installed the city’s first parking-protected bike lanes on 9th Avenue. “Streets are some of the most valuable resources that a city has, and yet it’s an asset that’s largely hidden in plain sight.” Click play for more insight.

Arend Schwab: Why Bicycles Do Not Fall

Have you ever wondered how a bicycle works? Why doesn’t it just fall over? How does it balance on its own? The seemingly simple bicycle is actually quite complicated when you start to consider the mechanics behind it. In this fascinating video, Arend Schwab gives you look at the science behind the bicycle, and what the future may hold.

Arend did his BSc in Engineering at Dordrecht (1979), and his MSc (1983) and PhD (2002) at Delft. He runs the bicycle mechanics lab and teaches mechanics.

Jeff Speck: The Walkable City

Designing cities is really like designing peoples lives. Jeff Speck talks here about the impact of walk-able and bike-able cities on the health and wellness of it’s residents. Such cities encourage people to walk or bike where possible; and they ultimately lead to healthier residents and a better quality of life than citizens of non walk-able/bike-able cities. The proof is here!

Shimon Schocken: What a Bike Ride Can Teach You

When a university professor gets out to the wilderness for some mountain biking with teenagers from a juvenile correction facility, the magic of cycling takes over. The program Shimon Schocken started in Israel was not an easy venture for him or the kids he sought to help, but in the end lessons were learned by both parties, and cycling provided a platform for that learning.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment