Slow down your ride and try a rear rack for carrying your things.

Every winter, there is a plethora of blogs offering information and advice to winter commuters – what to wear, how to cope with road conditions, and how to keep the bike going through ice and snow.

Then spring rolls around and everyone breathes a huge sigh of relief, and if they haven’t been riding all winter, they pull their bike out of the basement or the shed and start riding again.

And now it’s almost summer. Hot weather is here. And although it might not seem like it, hot weather can be as difficult to ride in, in its own way, as cold weather. To that end, we at Montague offer some summer commuting tips:

Someone has already attached a bottle cage to this Montague bike.

1. Make sure you stay hydrated. Bicycle riding is exercise. Even if you ride slowly, you’re still out in the heat and sun. If you’ve got a commute that’s longer than about a mile (think 5 minutes), it’s not a bad idea to ride with a water bottle. (All Montague bikes have water bottle bosses on the front edge of the rear triangle that will fit a standard bottle cage).

2. Wear sunscreen. Unless you’re riding in a turtleneck and long pants, you’re going to be out in the sun more than you think. Don’t get burned.

3. If you’re worried about being sweaty, there are a few options:

If you’re worried about overheating, ride in regular clothes and change at work.

a. Give yourself a little extra time. If you don’t have to ride as hard, you won’t work up as much of a sweat.

b. Ride in a t-shirt and shorts and carry your work clothes with you. This way, you don’t have to worry about spending the day in sweaty clothes. Leave a pair of dress shoes at your desk to help keep the load light.

c. If you don’t have access to a shower at work, see if you can use the facilities at a nearby gym, YMCA, or health club.

d. Keep a towel or some baby wipes at work so that you can give yourself a good wipe down in the bathroom if necessary.

e. Use a rack and basket or panniers to avoid the unsightly backpack sweat mark.

4. Don’t ride in flip flops. I know it’s hot. I know it’s tempting. But the last thing you want to do is lose your footwear in traffic.

Any Commuting Tips to Share?

How does your commute change in the summer months? Any hot tips to pass on to new (or old) commuters? How do you beat the heat? Don’t let the heat keep you off the bike this summer, and as always, Ride Safe!